Information about IAS :- Indian Administrative Service

Complete Information about IAS Indian Administrative Service

INDIAN ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE (IAS)

 

This is the complete article which will give you maximum information about IAS and its duties. The system of posting and allocation of states  is also mentioned here in this post for Candidates.

“The Indian Administrative Service (IAS) is the administrative unit of the
Executive branch of the Government of the Republic of India. The IAS officers
handle the affairs of the Government. At the Central level, this involves the
framing and implementation of the Government policies.
Every candidate appearing at the examination who is otherwise eligible,
shall be permitted 6 attempts at the examination.”

          When a discourse on the Indian administrative mechanism is carried out, everybody feels compelled to call the Indian Civil Services the backbone of the set-up which plays the main role in keeping together a vast country like India. It is the important role that these sought- after services play in the day-to-day functioning which has made them the coveted choice of the millions who want to enjoy limitless prestige and power. Though corporate jobs offer the prospect of fast growth with regard to perks, they have not been able to dim the attraction of the Civil Services as they guarantee a lifetime of unbridled power so far as policy-making is concerned. Every year, thousands of successful engineers, doctors, law graduates, MBAs, along with general students vie for a few hundred posts and try to get through the three-phase exam called Civil Services Examination that is conducted by the Union Public Service Commission.

Here is the Info graphic presentation of IAS Exam

Overview Of UPSC examinations

The IAS officers are responsible for the management of the various administrative departments and their respective functions. This includes framing of policies and acting as advisors to the ministers as well as executing appointed duties as the officers in charge of the administration of smaller administrative units. The District Magistrate for instance, is in charge of a district and has to look after the law and order situation as well as the administration and the over all development of the area.

 

HISTORY

After Independence, when our great leaders thought of making India a democracy, a number of people thought that it was not possible for a country of India’s size with many social complexities to succeed in its attempt. They watched with awe in the years that followed, because it stuck to its democratic values despite a number of contradictions. It kept on doing away with all the problems one by one and marched towards a secure future. Since Independence, it has made giant strides in many fields and emerged as a force to be reckoned with. It has shown the world that it believes in the philosophy of unity amidst diversity and has been eager to share all the responsibilities with other nations of the world, which aim at the common good of the people across the globe.
Various governments at both the Central and State levels have come and gone, but it has never compromised its belief in democratic values and age-old ideal of peaceful coexistence, for petty gains. As it has a democratically elected Government, the public representatives are assigned the task of running the system both at the Central and State levels, but those elected representatives are only the proxy rulers. Actually, for all their policy-making decisions, they are dependent on the shrewd, skilful and knowledgeable individuals called bureaucrats.

The officers who are recruited through the
Civil Services Examination for the Indian
Administrative Service are posted as Additional
District Magistrates at the entry level after
training. They are considered equivalent to
Under Secretary in the Government of India.

They dictate their terms with ready consent of their superiors (political bosses) to the docile masses and carry out every task according to their own will. They do not care for any opposition, as they are seldom criticised or penalised for any wrong policy on their part. They decide the fate of the nation as the implementation of all developmental and other government policy rest with them. It is the facade of political system behind which they work which is held responsible for all the wrong policies and their implementation. In other words, it is the political leaders at the helm of every department who face the wrath of the masses. The bureaucrats escape almost unscathed, because they collectively form the intangible and impenetrable citadel called bureaucracy. In fact, Article 311 of the Constitution, which was designed to infuse bureaucrats with the courage to criticise their superiors, has created a climate of excessive security without fear of penalty for incompetence or wrongdoing as well. And the recent Supreme Court verdict is going to give more teeth to the civil services, in which the apex court has directed the Centre and the States to set up a Civil Services Board for the management of transfers, postings, inquiries, process of promotion, reward, punishment and disciplinary matters and fix the tenure of the bureaucrats. The aim is to insulate the bureaucracy from political interference and put an end to the frequent transfers of civil servants by political bosses.
The Great Rebellion of 1857 catalysed the institution of Indian Civil Services, which came into being after the passage of Government of India Act, 1858. The colonial masters treated Indians as a ‘barbaric’ class, incapable of running their own country. They were meted out the worst treatment in their own land by the British who were least concerned with public welfare and always thought in terms of their own profit. The Indian people, who toiled like bonded labour, did accept their subjugation, no doubt, but at times, they felt like revolting against the oppression and atrocities they were subjected to. But the bureaucracy created by the British, the imperialist tradition of the colonial government, worked as a shield and every attempt of rebelling against the exploitative rule was suppressed. Thus, India has naturally received an administrative legacy bequeathed by the foreign rulers. In his renowned book, “Discovery of India”, Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru, has rightly written that “the Indian Civil Service (ICS) was neither. Indian, nor civil, nor a service.” It is more than sixty-five years since the Indian independence, but even today, it is persistently argued that Indian bureaucrats, retaining the negative aspects of the imperial legacy are maladjusted, lack dedication and tend to be authoritarian. If we talk of the positive aspects of the British rule, we cannot deny that it was the British rule which gave us a unified India, a sound system of governance and an urge to look forward to the developments taking place globally. Lord Cornwallis, disgusted by the prevalent corruption in the company’s administrative machinery, instituted the Civil Services to effectively administer the British-held territory in India. He introduced strict regulations for the officials, raised their salary and linked promotion to seniority; however, its higher level was restricted to the British employees only.

 

ROLE OF INDIAN CIVIL SERVANTS

Those who have got into the highly esoteric Civil Services are supposed to carry forward the message of national integration with sincerity and devotion. But they have never tried to identify themselves with the masses and believe that they belong to a higher group of individuals who are there only to implement the policy decided by the government and do not owe any direct responsibility for their actions. They knowingly or unknowingly overlook the interest of the masses and are more interested in carrying out their assigned tasks. Such exercises seldom or never aim at establishing rapport with the public or malting any sincere attempt to raise the level of public participation in the general administrative process. In other words, bureaucracy in India is very hierarchical and there is hardly any mutual trust between various Government units or even employees within a particular department. The administration and management of public

 

The administration and management of public affairs
Abbreviation I.A.S.
Formed 1946
Country India
Training Ground Lai Bahadur Shastri National Academy of Administration, Mussoorie
Controlling Authority Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and
Pensions, Department of Personnel and Training
Legal Personality Governmental: Government service
General Nature  Policy Formulation; Policy Implementation; Civil Administration; Advisors to Ministers; Managing  Bureaucracy (Centre and States)
Preceding Service  Indian Civil Service (1893— 1946)
Head of the Civil Services Cabinet Secretary

 

 

 

The service is thought so important by
people that though the IAS officers are
posted under various State Governments
with other Central services officers, the
respective State Governments have no power
to take disciplinary action against them at
their own will. The Governments have
control over them, but they cannot censure
any IAS officer without consulting the
Union Government and the
Union Public Service Commission.

affairs that prevail in India today reflect the family atmosphere and departments are run in the same way as homes in a society do. These family-like ties are reflected in the actions that are taken in various departments. People are trained not to question the working of the system, but only to know their respective roles and follow instructions. The superiors expect their subordinate officers to show loyalty more to them than to the carrying out of the actual tasks that are meant for public welfare. This initiates a dangerous chain of command, which ends up serving their own needs instead of the nation.
The task of a civil servant is considered very significant in the country’s administration, ranging from upholding the law and order to the collection of revenue as well as a tool to implement the national and state policies of welfare and planned economic development. The service is thought so important by people that though the IAS. officers are posted under various State Governments with other central services officers, the respective State Governments have no power to take disciplinary action against them at their own will. The Governments have control over them, but they cannot censure any IAS officer without consulting the Union Government and the Union Public Service Commission. Though this independence has often been severely criticized by several quarters of civil society, the status of the IAS officers has remained intact. Their privileged status has established the IAS as a brand and all the Central services officers, i.e. IPS, IRS, etc. are referred to as IAS officers.
For direct recruitment, the Union Public Service Commission conducts the Civil Services exam every year. However, recruitment into IAS is also done by appointment by selection through powers conferred by section 3 of the All India Services Act of 1951 (61 of 1951) and in pursuance of sub-rule (2) of rule 8 of the Indian Administrative Service (Recruitment) Rules of 1954 and in super-session of the Indian Administrative Service (Appointment by Selection) Regulations of 1956.

 

 

PLACEMENT

After selection, candidates are allocated to cadres. There is one cadre for each State, except for three joint cadres: Assam— Meghalaya, Manipur-Tripura, and Arunachal Pradesh—Goa- Mizoram—Union Territories (AGMUT). The insider : outsider ratio in the services is 1:2, i.e. the ratio of officers who are posted in their home State.
The officers who are recruited through the Civil Services Examination for the Indian Administrative Service are posted

SERVICES/POSTS TO WHICH RECRUITMENT
Is To BE MADE THROUGH
THE EXAMINATION ARE

(1) Indian Administrative Service (IAS)
(2) Indian Foreign Service (IFS)
(3) Indian Police Service (IPS)
(4) Indian P & T Accounts & Finance Service, Group ‘A’
(5) Indian Audit and Accounts Service, Group ‘A’
(6) Indian Revenue Service (Customs and Central Excise) Group ‘A’
(7) Indian Defence Accounts Service, Group ‘A’
(8) Indian Revenue Service, Group ‘A’ (IRS)
(9) Indian Ordnance Factories Service, Group ‘A’
(Assistant Works Manager, Non-technical)
(10) Indian Postal Service, Group ‘A’
(11) Indian Civil Accounts Service, Group A’
(12) Indian Railway Traffic Service, Group ‘A’
(13) Indian Railway Accounts Service, Group A’
(14) Indian Railway Personnel Service, Group A
(15) Post of Assistant Security Officer, Group A in Railway Protection Force
(16) Indian Defence Estates Service, Group A
(17) Indian Information Service. (Junior Grade), Group A
(18) Indian Trade Service, Group A’ (Grade-Ill)
(19) Indian Corporate Law Service, Group “A”
(20) Armed Forces Headquarters Civil Service, Group ‘B’ (Section Officer’s Grade)
(21) Delhi, Andaman & Nicobar Islands,
Lakshadweep, Daman & Diu and Dadr’a & Nagar Haveli Civil Service, Group T3’
(22) Delhi, Andaman & Nicobar Islands,
Lakshadweep, Daman & Diu and Dadra & Nagar Haveli Police Service, Group ‘B’
(23) Pondicherry Civil Service, Group ‘B’
(24) Pondicherry Police Service, Group ‘B’
as Additional District Magistrates at the entry level after training. They are considered equivalent to Under Secretary in the Government of India. Thereafter, they are promoted to the post of District Magistrates or Collectors or Deputy Commissioners which make them equivalent to the post of Deputy Secretary in the Government of India; Subsequently, they become Special Secretaries of Heads of Departments at the

The task of a civil servant is considered
very significant in the country’s
administration, ranging from upholding
the law and order to the collection of
revenue as well as a tool to implement
the national and state policies of welfare
and planned economic development

Government Offices on a par with Director in the Government of India.
After that they become Principal Secretaries or Financial Commissioners in the respective State Governments. Their next promotion is as Chief Secretaries in the State Government departments which is an equivalent post to that of the Secretary in the Central Government. Their next promotion, however, is to the post of Cabinet Secretary which has no equivalent post in the State Government. There is only one post of Cabinet Secretary to the Government of India who is ex- officio and Chairman of the Civil Services Board of the Republic of India; the Chief of the IAS and head of all civil services under the rules of business of the Government of India. Thus, the officers of the IAS play a major role in managing the bureaucracy of both the Union Government and the State Governments, with the officers holding strategic posts across the country.
The Indian bureaucracy has also been said to have a strong link with the political leadership. This link has often been held responsible for the strange administrative culture in India which many people perceive as lacking in morality, and having unethical conduct. The concept of a “committed bureaucracy” is being encouraged subtly. A dangerous trend of the politician-business-media house nexus is spreading its tentacles in the bureaucratic network as well. People often complain that frequent promises to reform the bureaucracy have not yielded any result so far, because the civil services in India are a power centre in its own right. The IAS officers also have their own list of complains which seem genuine. They complain that they have to work with the system that victimises them through harassment and pressures from local politicians, frequent punitive transfers and threats to their families. In order to put an end to this abuse of power, the previous Dr. Manmohan Singh Government has decided to limit the prerogatives of Chief Ministers with regard to all- India civil servants. The common perception is this that the IAS officers form a powerful lobby at the national level, and they have resisted and will resist any proposal that threatens their position. It is their power which, in fact, determines their prestige among the Indian masses to a great extent and more and more ambitious youth are desirous of getting a share of what the IAS officers have.
Though coaching institutes for the Civil Services Examination have been mushrooming over the years, they cannot cater to the underprivileged aspirants hailing from backward areas of the country on account of their exorbitant fees. In view of the existing situation, many State governments have started their own coaching institutes where experts offer their valuable guidance to the students from remote areas as well as financially weak students. A number of such institutes have to their credit the success of their pupils in cracking the three-stage prestigious Civil Services Examination.

 

Click here to know the eligibility Criteria 

Though the avenues the CSE opens to the aspiring and enthusiastic youth are all of the above-mentioned, given its importance the Indian Administrative Service is the most preferred choice of successful candidates. So much so that all the Civil Services are referred to in common parlance as IAS. The Indian Administrative Service (IAS) is the administrative unit of the Executive branch of the Government of the Republic of India. The IAS officers handle the affairs of the Government. At the Central level, this involves the framing and implementation of the Government policies. They represent the Government in other countries and international forums as well. They are even authorised to sign agreements on behalf of the Government. At the district level, however, the IAS is concerned with the affairs of the districts that include development functions. At the Divisional level, the IAS officers look after the law and order, general administration and development work.

Also Know Number of Attempts 

After being selected for the Indian Administrative Service, the candidates are allocated to “cadres”. There is a single cadre in each Indian State, except three joint cadres : Assam-Meghalaya, Manipur-Tripura, and Arunachal Pradesh-Goa-Mizoram-Union Territories (AGMUT). While allocating cadres the insider- outsider ratio is maintained as 1:2. The insiders are those candidates who are posted to their respective home States. Till eight years ago, i.e. the year 2008, there was no choice for any State cadre and the .candidates, if not placed in the insider vacancy of their home States, were allotted to different States in alphabetical order of the roster, beginning with A, B, C, D, and so on. For example, if in a particular year, the roster began from A, it meant that the first candidate in the roster would go to the Andhra Pradesh cadre, the next to the Bihar cadre, then to the Chhattisgarh, Gujarat and so on. The next year, the roster started from H, for either Haryana or Himachal Pradesh (if it started from Haryana in the previous year when it all started from H, then the following year it would start from Himachal Pradesh). This highly intricate system was not thought fair later on. On the one hand, it ensured that officers from different States were placed all over India, on the other, it also resulted in wide disparities in the form of professional exposure for officers, since the system ensured that the officers were permanently placed to one State cadre.

 

Here is the way to crack exam in one attempt 

 

Sandeep

Hi Guys, I am Sandeep Co-founder of IASpaper and UPSCToday Staying in Mumbai (India) and pursuing graduation in Computer Science and Engineering from Mumbai University. I love helping Aspirants. You may join me on Facebook

3 thoughts on “Information about IAS :- Indian Administrative Service

  • November 6, 2016 at 4:43 pm
    Permalink

    It is REALLY so informative and useful for IAS aspirents. The pattern desined so and used here is also alluring and have easy grasping methodology for everyone irrespective of their calibre level. Being in happy mood I will prefer to say that it is like “GAGAR mein SAGAR” that means whole Ocean has been poured into water- pot which is herculean job.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2017 at 10:12 am
    Permalink

    You have typed wrong spelling of lt. Sh. Lal bahadur shastri u written lai bahadur shastri plzzzz recorrect it

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *